Arrival Alone - Kings Cross St Pancras Station, by John Duffin

Arrival Alone - Kings Cross St Pancras Station, by John Duffin

56 x 38 cm

Etching

Arrival Alone - Kings Cross St Pancras Station, by John Duffin

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Arrival Alone - Kings Cross St Pancras Station, by John Duffin
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John Duffin’s characterful etchings celebrate the familiar urban landscape of London.

Four of his limited edition prints are on display in the Keeper’s House from 15 September 2017 to 19 February 2018.

In stock

£245.00
Own Art

Artwork description

In his dramatic renderings of London John Duffin depicts well-known landmarks and the everyday hustle and bustle of urban life. While paying homage to many celebrated artists, such as Edward Bawden, who have worked in the tradition of printmaking, Duffin charges his own imagery with energy through his use of intense contrasts of black and white, and extreme perspectives that highlight the architecture, landscape and those who inhabit them.
  • Medium - Etching
  • Dimensions - 56 x 38 cm
  • Edition - 150

About John Duffin

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John Duffin originally comes from Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria. Before pursuing a career in printmaking, Duffin worked as a shipbuilder. He enrolled into Goldsmiths College in 1985 before moving onto Central St. Martins to undertake an MA in Printmaking.


Duffin has exhibited in many solo exhibitions, held in London and Cumbria, in such places as the OXO Tower and Southwark Cathedral. He has appeared regularly in the Royal Academy of Art’s Summer Exhibition and Bankside Gallery. His most recent exhibitions have been held in Chelsea Arts Club, For Arts Sake Gallery and Cambridge Contemporary Art. Publications include: Hometown, 2011 and Northern Lights, 2013. Duffin’s works are also displayed public collections at BBC London, Museum of London, Southbank Centre London and Network Rail Art collection.


The scenes captured in John Duffin’s prints display the rhythm and humanity of urban life. Whilst it is evident that Duffin has been highly influenced by Edward Hopper, his prints depict images of cities that are fulfilled with life and energy; allowing the subject matter of the City to become a character in its own right. Duffin’s work can be strongly recognised as neo-noir by his use of use of deep black shadows, striking architecture and extreme angles. This cinematic approach to his practice enables him to portray personality in these images. He imagines himself as the “silent onlooker”, devouring the poetry created through the movement of the city.