Thank you for your support! Our small team are working as quickly and safely as possible to prepare and send online orders. Please expect a delay of 14 days maximum for orders to be sent out. Thanks for your patience.

Don't wait until it's too late! To ensure your gifts arrive in good time for Christmas, and to avoid disappointment, we recommend placing UK orders before 6 December. 

The RA Shop online is now open, and you can shop an edit of our collections at the RA Shops at Burlington House and Burlington Gardens, with a free ticket.

We are currently doing some behind the scenes improvement. There will be a 7-10 day delay on deliveries from 7 August. Thank you for your patience.

For more information on our shops and services and how we are keeping our visitors and staff safe, please click here

Tote Bag RA x Bella Freud Naked Self Portrait

The daughter of Bernardine Coverley and artist Lucian Freud, and the Great Granddaughter of the inventor of Psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud, Bella Freud was born in London. She studied in Rome and trained with Vivienne Westwood before launching her eponymous brand in 1990 - with a logo designed by her father.

This tote bag features the limited edition screenprint Naked Self Portrait, 2019 by Bella Freud on one side and on the other Bella Freud's logo, designed by her father Lucian Freud. 

Naked Self Portrait celebrates the work of Bella's father and was created exclusively for the RA to accompany the exhibition Lucian Freud: The Self-portraits.

- +
Add to gift list
£17.50
In stock

More details

Dimensions 50 x 42 x 10cm
SKU 12089944

Delivery & returns information

Service Update (updated 19 March 2020)

We want to make sure your order reaches you as safely as possible. Therefore, due to the outbreak of COVID-19, all orders will be dispatched once the RA has reopened. We will be in touch once the RA has reopened and once your order has been dispatched. 

During this period our Returns Policy will be extended. For any order queries, please Contact Us

Free UK delivery on orders £50 and over

International delivery is based on weight and delivery country, and will be calculated at Checkout

Our small team are working as quickly and safely as possible to prepare and send online orders. Please expect a delay of 14 days maximum for your order to be sent out. Thank you for your patience. 

Enjoy free shipping on orders above £50. £5.95 P&P for orders below £50. International delivery will be calculated at Checkout. The RA is temporarily closed, collection is not available at this time.

For any questions talk to us

Updated 19 May 2020

We are delivering! Enjoy free shipping on orders above £50. £5.95 P&P for orders below £50. International delivery will be calculated at Checkout. The Royal Academy is temporarily closed, Collection is not available at this time.

For any questions talk to us

Product story

In a world first, the Royal Academy of Arts unite Lucian Freud’s self-portraits in one extraordinary exhibition. See more than 50 paintings, prints and drawings in which this modern master of British art turns his unflinching eye firmly on himself.

One of the most celebrated portraitists of our time, Lucian Freud is also one of very few 20th century artists who portrayed themselves with such consistency.
Spanning nearly seven decades, his self-portraits give a fascinating insight into both his psyche and his development as a painter – from his earliest portrait, painted in 1939, to his final one executed 64 years later. They trace the fascinating evolution from the linear graphic works of his early career to the fleshier, painterly style he became synonymous with. When seen together, his portraits represent an engrossing study into the process of ageing. Confronting his self-image anew with each work, he depicted himself in youth as the Greek hero Acteon, in sombre reflection later in life and fittingly, for the great painter of 20th century nudes, naked aged 71 but for a pair of unlaced boots.

When asked if he was a good model for himself Freud replied, “No, I don’t accept the information that I get when I look at myself, that’s where the trouble starts”. It is precisely this “trouble” that makes Freud’s self-portraits so intensely compelling – and makes this an unmissable chance to see a life’s work in one show.

Reviews